Venice airport tips and vocabulary

 

My holiday is nearing so I thought I’d share some useful vocab and tips for your future travels to Italy!

I’m going to talk about the two Venice airports are they are the ones I have used the most (on this trip I’ll actually be flying into Bologna so if I notice anything noteworthy I may share it in a future blog post!)

Tips: arriving at the airport Continue reading “Venice airport tips and vocabulary”

I can’t wait

I can’t wait is translated as Non vedo l’ora, which literally means “I can’t see the time”.

It’s used when you want to show that you’re looking forward to something, e.g.

Non vedo l’ora di andare al mare / I can’t wait to go to the beach

Non vediamo l’ora di andare fuori a cena! / We can’t wait to go out for dinner!

I, for one, can’t wait to go back to Italy!

Non vedo l’ora di ritornare in Italia!

A body of water

A part of my upcoming trip, I will be visiting Lake Garda, Italy’s largest body of water, i.e.

Il piu` grande (the largest) specchio d’acqua (body of water) in Italia.

Italian can be an extremely descriptive and emotional language, and I have always thought that phrases such as specchio d’acqua were always very evocative.

This is probably on of those random phrases you will rarely (if ever) get to use in real-life situations, but in my opinion is beautiful.

 

Conversational practice

A common complaint amongst Italian self-taught learners is that their reading and writing skills are quite good, but their oral and listening skills are lagging way behind.

This is partly because Italians speak fast, and attempting to listen to the radio or TV shows from Italy can be disheartening, but also because attempting to have a conversation with someone in a different language can be incredibly daunting.

I am a huge believer in finding someone you can practice your language with (whichever it might be), for several reasons: Continue reading “Conversational practice”